What’s So Great About Halloween?

(This is an article written by my dear friend, Phyllis Kruger).

Many years ago I was introduced to Halloween by my Primary teacher.  She made it such a fun day.  We learned a fun song and made a mask with a brown paper bag.  A sheet completed my “costume,” I could hardly wait to get it home and perform for my family (which were my Grandparents). My Grandmother helped me get dressed in my sheet and brown paper bag mask.  I emerged and performed for my Granddaddy who responded with proper appreciation.  When I grew old enough to go “Trick or Treating” it was still fun even without a costume.  There were never tricks, in my experience, because people provided a treat – even at the height of the depression.

Many years ago I was introduced to Halloween by my Primary teacher.  She made it such a fun day.  We learned a fun song and made a mask with a brown paper bag.  A sheet completed my “costume,” I could hardly wait to get it home and perform for my family (which were my Grandparents). My Grandmother helped me get dressed in my sheet and brown paper bag mask.  I emerged and performed for my Granddaddy who responded with proper appreciation.  When I grew old enough to go “Trick or Treating” it was still fun even without a costume.  There were never tricks, in my experience, because people provided a treat – even at the height of the depression.

Unfortunately, that has all changed because of our “liberated” culture some have chosen to resurrect practices of “Satan’s High Dark Day”.  While this “truth” existed historically in our Christian Nation it was not generally flaunted as it is today.  Some years ago, I learned from Charles Swindoll that Halloween is a very significant holiday for all protestant believers, yet I rarely hear or see it printed.  (I was aware that Martin Luther had a hand in the Protestant church, but I didn’t know the significance of Halloween).  It was Halloween, October 31st in 1517 when Martin Luther nailed his Theses of Contention to the Wittenberg Church door.  It brought about liberation of the Word’s truths and placed it into the hands of the common people.

At that time in the Church, the way to salvation was not clear. In fact, the understanding of salvation was downright erroneous. There were some clergy teaching that a person could be saved, or forgiven of their sins by purchasing what was called an indulgence. This concept totally removed contrition and repentance from a person’s life. A person could be saved from hell, simply if he or she had enough cash and paid the price. This clergy also taught that people could be delivered from purgatory if an indulgence was purchased on their behalf. Luther argued that if the Pope actually had the ability to release souls from the clutches of hell and purgatory, then why didn’t he simply do it? Why did the exchange of money need to take place? This errant theology actually hindered people from finding salvation in Christ as it gave a false sense of security. If salvation could be purchased then why would Jesus Christ have had to die?

Luther taught that Salvation is not from good works, but a free gift of God, received only by grace through faith in Jesus as Redeemer from sin (Romans 3:24-25). He was officially branded a heretic, publicly defrocked, rebuked and excommunicated which merely fueled his fire.  The man remained the embodiment of authentic courage.  I learned that we used to celebrate a holiday on October 31st  called Reformation Day.  I even read of a Reformation Day Conference in Colorado Springs, this year, the title is “Martin Luther Saint and Sinner”.  My inclination is to say, “Aren’t we all”.

So let us remember the primary reason to celebrate October 31st is for one of the many great truths promoted by Martin Luther, which is found in the Bible in Romans 1:17, “The righteous shall live by faith.” And that faith is in Jesus Christ.

Sola Fide!!!